Fence, part 2 (first span)

posted in: Creativity, Travel | 2

This fence in Port Townsend, Washington, enchanted us. It starts at a modest, weathered wood gate (on the left in the photo below). Then it moves into some vertical salvaged wood, likely driftwood pieces from area beaches. From that point on, the vertical posts are consistent but each panel has a unique construction and personality.

The first two panels are only shown in these first two photos.

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Check out the movement and contrast between adjacent panels. . . .

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In the previous photo, this is the panel that my mother is standing in front of and admiring:

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Here’s a closer detail:

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Salvaged crafted wood in the last section, and salvaged natural wood in the next one:

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. . . followed by lattice work and rectilinearity, and some straight, smooth, cylindrical limbs . . .

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I love the stubby little thick pieces near the top.

Next come curves produced primarily (but not entirely) with straight pieces of milled wood:

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Then we get a variation emphasizing bamboo—probably gathered locally. Bamboo grows abundantly here . . . I still have pieces that I pruned from someone’s garden when I was working in landscape maintenance:

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Then a spider’s web combining the milled, stained wood and the natural, gathered variety:

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. . . and we need some close-ups of the web’s inhabitants . . .

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The final panel along this side creates both an invitation to the garden (in its center, ladder-like area) and a sense that the space is private (in the diagonals on the sides). . . .

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The next entry in this sequence of photo posts will turn the corner.

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2 Responses

  1. Love this. Thanks.

  2. So glad to be able to show you, Lynn. You'd love it even more in person. Some day?

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