Where I’m working on the project this weekend

Here's where I've been fortunate enough to be able to move some of my boxes to work on the project this weekend:

Cabin_2509

The big yellow and red container is the backup water supply (it backs up what is in the kettle inside). See the large black bell on the pole at the edge of the deck, to the right of the big windows? Before walking down to use the facilities, especially after dark, it's wise to pull the rope and make it clang loudly to let the bear (which I have not seen) know that there are people in the area and it should amble off as quickly as it can, if it happens to be around.

There's a fantastic view from the front deck:

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Although I have the cabin to myself, here are some of the neighbors who live just past the facilities:

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That's Jewel; Dancer, who is a BLM rescue horse; and donkey Duke (sort of hiding). The aspens in front of them have had their bark chewed off by the equines (who are not allowed near most of the trees) because these trees are intended for use in some projects and stripping aspen bark is difficult, whereas horses like to eat it.

Here's Nickers, who is a chow-hound:

Nickers_2512

The person feeding him is Carol, who is also involved with The Project and invited me to use the cabin. Behind her is one of today's visitors, Tuf:

Tuf_2503  
Lou also spent the day here:

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Because of the rain, of which we had a bit more this afternoon, the wildflowers have been blooming abundantly this year. Here's a kind of penstemon:

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and wild geranium:

Wild-geranium_2514

We accomplished a number of things by working all together. Yet it took much longer to get here last night than I thought it would, and then I didn't get to sleep easily, so now it's time for bed. Tomorrow we have another day to make the most of—although I'll also need to drive back to where I usually work, which will cut the available hours in half, unfortunately.

Sunset_2516

Who needs running water and plumbing?

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9 Responses

  1. OK, now I am dying to know where it is!

  2. Wow! It looks wonderful. Too bad you can’t stay longer. Don’t regret the travel hours. Think of the energy you are getting just from being in that special place. (I especially like the horses in your backyard…)

  3. Such a beautiful location. Enjoy! I think a day or two of spinning in a place like that would be so restorative. I have managed just a couple of hours of spinning (it’s a good break from packing) and I feel so much better. What would 2 days be like?!

  4. Good for you! I hope the rest of the weekend was similarly productive. The penstemon is blue mist penstemon, and the geranium is sticky geranium.

    We’re in Denver moving my folks into a retirement community. Fun, fun, fun. Last week was Aspen (Colo Book Awards, which Colorado Scenic Byways won), then moving the folks, then Walsenburg where I was the guest author at the dedication of the new public library, then Denver to pick Molly up, Salida for the opening of the sculpture show Richard’s in, and then back to Denver again today for more moving. No wonder I haven’t had time to blog or email or think or sleep….

  5. Teller County. I think Florissant is the closest easily recognized location.

  6. Some spinning, some talking, much coordination of efforts.

    I can tell you that a week of spinning and writing (as in Salida) was bliss.

    This was mighty fine, though, and I came back feeling like this project may not be endless. . . . Worth the drive to get that.

  7. Susan, I figured you might be able to help me with the flowers! I could get in the neighborhood, but not to precise names (especially with no field guide at hand).

    I wondered what you were up to, other than Walsenberg.

    Yes, I noticed you had won a Colorado Book Award for Colorado Scenic Byways! I “tweeted” about that when I discovered the news (up in the mountains). Congratulations! If anybody else had won in your category, I’d know something was wrong with the judging. It’s a wonderful accomplishment and deserves every award.

    Carol Ekarius, with whom I was working this weekend, won in the general nonfiction category for Storey’s Illustrated Breed Guide to Sheep, Goats, Cattle and Pigs.

    Yay!

  8. I clapped and hooted when Carol’s award was announced, even though she wasn’t there. We’re in great company this year, as I just wrote on my blog: David Wroblewski won fiction, Amy Irvine creative non-fiction, and a host of other wonderful writers took awards.

    What I’m doing now is being sick, sick, sick. Fever, chills, a head filled with moco (snot). Can’t wait to finish moving my folks and get home!

  9. The sunset is incredible. I must admit a big fondness for running water and flush toilets, but I’m very happy that you shared the photos.

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