Finished! Bulky afghan for a book project about Dorothy Reade

posted in: Books, Knitting | 3

I've just finished a project for a book that will be published before long; based on when the deadline is, my best guess is that the book will appear in the first half of next year. I'm just a contributor.

The project I've been asked to work up is a lace afghan knitted in one of Dorothy Reade's original lace patterns, using bulky yarn (Brown Sheep Burly Spun). The finished afghan is what I call "just the right size," having based it on an afghan I've been using for years.

Without giving away too much, here's what the afghan looks like as of a few minutes ago, laid out on a bunch of towels on my daughter's bedroom floor (I washed the nearly 4 pounds (1.7kg) of afghan in a plastic basin in the bathtub, then spun out the extra water in the spin-only cycle of the top-loading washer):

Afghan_2119

I used lace-blocking wires along the edges, but didn't pin them to stretch it. I just wanted to do a general squaring-up. At this gauge, everything's going to be somewhat floppy in the end anyway.

Here's what I worked from—a chart made in the first version of Knit Visualizer, held in a page protector. I moved the sticky notes just above the pattern row to be worked next (repositioned at the completion of each pattern row). The repeats are highlighted. I also put stitch markers between repeats on the needle, even though I had to remove and replace them when a decrease crossed the boundary lines. They were worth the effort.

Chart_2121_2

I enjoyed the lace pattern. It's a moderately large repeat with some
interesting and unusual aspects to the way it's put together. I had to
adjust my original concept for the afghan in order to accommodate this
specific lace. Once I got the plan put together, it was entertaining to
knit.

And, of course, once I'd washed it and spread it out I had to put up the gate so the dogs won't walk across the afghan while it's drying.

Gate_2123

I was supposed to be getting something else done this afternoon. But I was so close. . . . I finished with 3.5 ounces (100g) of fiber left over. At this gauge, that's not much, and the remainder consists primarily of the bits I pulled off in order to position all the joins in the plain border area at the edges of the fabric.

The only problem with working on a design for publication (other than deadlines, although I've made this one without stress) is that now this piece goes away for a long time, to be photographed, tech edited, and the like. I don't get to enjoy it in use until some time next year.

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3 Responses

  1. Very pretty. Your dogs must be longing to circle, circle, circle and lay down right in the middle.

  2. Finished is such a lovely word, isn’t it?

    You will love having the afghan when it becomes yours. I find that I make samples for shops, and I only get them back when the yarn goes out of production. For many yarns (Lamb’s Pride Worsted, Cascade 220) that may not happen in my career.

    So at least you get your piece back. You will love that one! Love the yarn you used, I have used it, too.

    Still snowing in Lansing. Still Tax season but I think I’ll finish tomorrow.

    I want to knit something just for me. Haven’t I said that recently??? Why is it so hard to do?

    Lynn

  3. Giving up that beauty (even for a little while) will be a real heart-breaker.
    I had never thought of combining bulky yarn and lace knitting. Hmmm…

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